2
Sep

I sincerely believe that Lawrence Block is one of our greatest living writers. I still hold Eight Million Ways to Die as one of the best novels I’ve ever read, and it is certainly one of the most influential to my growth as a novelist.

I am very much looking forward to seeing this movie. I think Neeson as Scudder is inspired casting.

2
Sep
1
Sep
Re: your "rule about naked people" -- How about people who take nude photos of themselves not be stupid and use storage devices that can be hacked, like cloud storage (or take any risks close to that)? Just HOW much personal responsibility does your generation need to shed before you get it through your thick skulls that it only costs $20 for a decent external hard drive these days? :|
— Anonymous

fishingboatproceeds:

"The lock on your diary wasn’t very good, so it’s your fault I read your diary."

1
Sep
Would you ever be at all tempted to pen a run on Captain America?
— Anonymous

In a hot second.

1
Sep
Through the Queen and Country series you're a writer who delves a lot into international politics and you have to portray other cultures as well. That's an area rife with controversy and grey zones. When portraying Israel, Africa, and Afghanistan how to you create a nuanced view and not make a cultural caricature. Have you ever had fears about portraying these kind of issues in entertainment, perhaps inaccurately?
malcolmloo

I work very hard in my research to try and understand the prominent opposing views. That said, there are certain stories and locations I’ve shied away from precisely because I fear that I would not be adequately able to represent the situation honestly (which is not necessarily the same thing as fairly, for instance). Israel is a good example of this — the situation is so infinitely more complex than most people are willing to acknowledge; the fact is, a lot of people don’t want to be challenged about their already-made-conclusions. They’ve made a decision, they don’t want to fly in the face of it.

There are certain lines, I suppose — you’re going to be hard-pressed to find a comics reader (or reader anywhere) who thinks that Boko Haram has the right idea, for instance — a Q&C story where Tara’s dealing with the abduction of, say, 200 schoolgirls isn’t really going to risk being controversial. Where it gets a little more delicate is in depicting the political motivations on different sides as to why there’s inaction, or action, or ambivalence.

I have my biases, and I rarely hide them, but I try to, at least, be honest (or as honest as my research and experience will allow) in my depictions in my stories. I think it makes for better story, honestly.

1
Sep
I recently bought your run on Wolverine on Comixology. Immediately became some of my favorite Wolverine stories. I couldn't help but feel as though the run ended somewhat abruptly. If you don't mind me asking but did you leave the book on your own accord or were you taken off of it?
— Anonymous

I departed the book, though I suspect it was just prior to being politely shown the exit. The numbers on our run weren’t terrific, and, when you’re talking about Wolverine, that’s saying something ;) This was all a while ago, but the long and the short of it was that I departed because I’d gone exclusive to DC, which, y’know… exclusive to DC. Loved working on the title with Darrick and Leo, I have to say.

1
Sep
I know you've written him a handful of times but, would you ever consider doing a run on Daredevil? That's something I'd personally love to see. Of course, in a perfect world, this would happen sometime after Mark Waid's brilliant run comes to it's natural end on Mark's terms.
jaketheoliveira

I’d love to write Daredevil at some point, but in all sincerity, it’s one of the more intimidating prospects I can imagine. Following writers like Mark, Ed, Brian… the list goes on and on and there’re so many stories that are so good… I genuinely don’t know what, if anything, I could offer to build on Matt’s legacy.

1
Sep
Why do you think Marvel completely abandoned the Cole Alves story after you left? Were they mad about you leaving or did they just not like the story? Did they think they could get away with not explaining how Frank broke out of an unbreakable underwater cell? That's pretty sad...WarZone had a great ending, there was so much that could have been expanded on and continued. It's a shame.
lurkerunknown

I didn’t leave; I was fired. They canceled the book. I can only assume that editorial didn’t care for the direction of the story and/or the sales numbers (probably both). That was their decision and their right. Before I had concluded the run, Frank was already leading another team, so it’s pretty clear to me that Marvel editorial wasn’t concerned with what I had been writing nor was interested in attempting to build any continuity.

This sounds more bitter than I am, I’m afraid; as I said, it’s entirely their right — it’s the nature of work-for-hire. I’m NOT bitter about it, I should stress, although I remain a little sad that we (ie, the entirety of the team working on the book) didn’t get to take the story to the places we had planned to take it.