17
Sep
comicsalliance:

BORN IN A WORLD OF TRAGEDY: GREG RUCKA REFLECTS ON HIS BATMAN WORK, PART ONE [INTERVIEW]
By Chris Sims
To say that Greg Rucka had a profound impact on DC Comics in the 21st Century is underselling things quite a bit. After arriving on the scene in the late ’90s, he became one of the few writers to have written all three of DC’s biggest characters, with critically acclaimed runs on Action Comics and Wonder Woman. It was on Batman, however, where he made his biggest impact, as one of the writers for the year-long No Man’s Land crossover, the relaunched “New Gotham” era of Detective Comics, and cowriter of the enduringly influential Gotham Central.

Today, we begin an in-depth look back at Rucka’s tenure on the Dark Knight, starting with No Man’s Land, both the comic and its surprisingly popular novelization, in which Gotham City becomes a dark dystopia following a cataclysmic earthquake; his feelings about the core idea of Batman; and his frustrations on seeing the Joker show up in the pages of Superman.
READ MORE

Had a lovely, long, and rambling chat with Chris Sims about my time in the Batman Universe. He’s easy to talk to. I’m not sure I’m that easy to listen to, but there you go….

comicsalliance:

BORN IN A WORLD OF TRAGEDY: GREG RUCKA REFLECTS ON HIS BATMAN WORK, PART ONE [INTERVIEW]

By Chris Sims

To say that Greg Rucka had a profound impact on DC Comics in the 21st Century is underselling things quite a bit. After arriving on the scene in the late ’90s, he became one of the few writers to have written all three of DC’s biggest characters, with critically acclaimed runs on Action Comics and Wonder Woman. It was on Batman, however, where he made his biggest impact, as one of the writers for the year-long No Man’s Land crossover, the relaunched “New Gotham” era of Detective Comics, and cowriter of the enduringly influential Gotham Central.

Today, we begin an in-depth look back at Rucka’s tenure on the Dark Knight, starting with No Man’s Land, both the comic and its surprisingly popular novelization, in which Gotham City becomes a dark dystopia following a cataclysmic earthquake; his feelings about the core idea of Batman; and his frustrations on seeing the Joker show up in the pages of Superman.

READ MORE

Had a lovely, long, and rambling chat with Chris Sims about my time in the Batman Universe. He’s easy to talk to. I’m not sure I’m that easy to listen to, but there you go….

12
Sep
12
Sep
Forging…. @emceeartist  (at Peet’s Coffee & Tea)

Forging…. @emceeartist (at Peet’s Coffee & Tea)

12
Sep
comicsalliance:

THE NAUGHTY KNOT: UNPACKING MARVEL EDITOR-IN-CHIEF AXEL ALONSO’S COMMENTS ON SEX APPEAL AND DIVERSITY
By Andrew Wheeler
In an interview with The Telegraph’s Radhika Sanghani, Marvel editor-in-chief Axel Alonso offered some insights into how he regards the superhero comic industry’s treatment of female characters — and his own intentions towards diversity.

The interview is chiefly noteworthy for confirming what already seems apparent from recent changes in Marvel’s line-up, namely that Marvel understands and is responding to demographic changes in the marketplace. “We believe there’s an audience of women out there who are hungry for this [product] and we want to make sure they get it,” said Alonso. “This is affirmative action. This is capitalism.”

Capitalism is not the starry-eyed spark for change that many of us might wish for, but realistically it’s usually the most effective. Comics is a business — and a very risk-averse business at that. Despite being relatively agile among entertainment media, with quick turnarounds and minimal personnel, superhero comics tend to follow change rather than trying to lead it.

The good news is that Marvel sees a profit motive and is not averse to it. The conservative instincts of superhero publishers — with their attentions fixed on known brands and past glories — can easily lead to a reflexive rejection of anything that feels unfamiliar, such as the paradigm-spinning notion that women are people and not set dressing. It’s sad to say it, but it actually feels like a win just to have evidence that the industry isn’t sliding backwards.
READ MORE

I think Andrew Wheeler is a very smart man.

comicsalliance:

THE NAUGHTY KNOT: UNPACKING MARVEL EDITOR-IN-CHIEF AXEL ALONSO’S COMMENTS ON SEX APPEAL AND DIVERSITY

By Andrew Wheeler

In an interview with The Telegraph’s Radhika Sanghani, Marvel editor-in-chief Axel Alonso offered some insights into how he regards the superhero comic industry’s treatment of female characters — and his own intentions towards diversity.

The interview is chiefly noteworthy for confirming what already seems apparent from recent changes in Marvel’s line-up, namely that Marvel understands and is responding to demographic changes in the marketplace. “We believe there’s an audience of women out there who are hungry for this [product] and we want to make sure they get it,” said Alonso. “This is affirmative action. This is capitalism.”

Capitalism is not the starry-eyed spark for change that many of us might wish for, but realistically it’s usually the most effective. Comics is a business — and a very risk-averse business at that. Despite being relatively agile among entertainment media, with quick turnarounds and minimal personnel, superhero comics tend to follow change rather than trying to lead it.

The good news is that Marvel sees a profit motive and is not averse to it. The conservative instincts of superhero publishers — with their attentions fixed on known brands and past glories — can easily lead to a reflexive rejection of anything that feels unfamiliar, such as the paradigm-spinning notion that women are people and not set dressing. It’s sad to say it, but it actually feels like a win just to have evidence that the industry isn’t sliding backwards.

READ MORE

I think Andrew Wheeler is a very smart man.