21
Oct
21
Oct
Caption: Skulls and bones in an ossuary with the remains of more than 50,000 people on October 19, 2012 under the Church of St. James in Brno, Czech Republic. Lost for some 200 years, the ossuary was discovered in 2001 during construction work under the Church of St James.

Photo caption: Michal Cizek; AFP; Getty Images; found at The Atlantic: InFocus

Caption: Skulls and bones in an ossuary with the remains of more than 50,000 people on October 19, 2012 under the Church of St. James in Brno, Czech Republic. Lost for some 200 years, the ossuary was discovered in 2001 during construction work under the Church of St James.

Photo caption: Michal Cizek; AFP; Getty Images; found at The Atlantic: InFocus

21
Oct
21
Oct
Caption: Blind student Marina Gimaraes, of the Association of Ballet and Arts for the Blind, warms up backstage before performing “Corsario e Paquitas” during celebrations marking Brazil’s Children’s Day at the Italo Theater in Sao Paulo on October 12, 2014. The Association was founded by Brazilian ballerina and physiotherapist Fernanda Bianchini in 1995, when she decided to teach classical ballet to the blind for free. Since then, her classes have been opened to the deaf and mute, and even to children and youths with other handicaps. Bianchini says that the school’s main goal for their students is for them to improve their posture, balance, spatial sense and self-esteem, in addition to breaking barriers and prejudices about people with handicaps.

Photo credit: Reutersl Nacho Doce; found at The Atlantic: InFocus

Caption: Blind student Marina Gimaraes, of the Association of Ballet and Arts for the Blind, warms up backstage before performing “Corsario e Paquitas” during celebrations marking Brazil’s Children’s Day at the Italo Theater in Sao Paulo on October 12, 2014. The Association was founded by Brazilian ballerina and physiotherapist Fernanda Bianchini in 1995, when she decided to teach classical ballet to the blind for free. Since then, her classes have been opened to the deaf and mute, and even to children and youths with other handicaps. Bianchini says that the school’s main goal for their students is for them to improve their posture, balance, spatial sense and self-esteem, in addition to breaking barriers and prejudices about people with handicaps.

Photo credit: Reutersl Nacho Doce; found at The Atlantic: InFocus

20
Oct
kellysue:

toobusytoread:

OMG! It’s here! It’s here! It happened! I found it!
powells got a copy for only $20 (in contrast to amazon’s $80) and I snatched it up!

Jason Aaron’s cousin, Gus Hasford. 

Is this true? The same Gus Hasford later arrested for having an inordinate number of overdue library books (if I remember correctly)???
That is awesome pedigree.
Me, I’m related to the one-time strongest man in the world who later died of blood poisoning.
Not nearly as awesome.

kellysue:

toobusytoread:

OMG! It’s here! It’s here! It happened! I found it!

powells got a copy for only $20 (in contrast to amazon’s $80) and I snatched it up!

Jason Aaron’s cousin, Gus Hasford. 

Is this true? The same Gus Hasford later arrested for having an inordinate number of overdue library books (if I remember correctly)???

That is awesome pedigree.

Me, I’m related to the one-time strongest man in the world who later died of blood poisoning.

Not nearly as awesome.

16
Oct
pennyfornasa:

“On October 19th, we’re going to observe an event that happens maybe once every million years.” – Dr. Jim Green, director of NASA’s planetary science divisionNASA is gearing up for the opportunity of a lifetime, one that could yield new information about the conditions that shaped our solar system and the atmosphere on Mars. In just one week, Comet Siding Spring, also known as C/2013 A1, will make its first trip through the inner solar system and pass within 87,000 miles (139,500 kilometers) of the Martian surface—approximately one-third the distance between Earth and the moon. Siding Spring gets its name from Australia’s Siding Spring Observatory, where astronomer Rob McNaught discovered the comet in 2013. Since Siding Spring comes from the Oort Cloud (and this happens to be the comet’s first “heat-treatment”), it is likely that the comet remains largely unchanged since its formation nearly 4.6 billion years ago. This creates an opportunity for scientists to study the composition and behavior of an object very similar to those that filled the early solar system, which could provide further clues about the conditions that existed when the solar system first formed. NASA’s Mars orbiters and rovers are preparing to study both the comet and its effect on Mars’ atmosphere. By studying how the comet interacts with the Red Planet’s air, scientists hope to gain a better understanding of the Martian atmosphere, in addition to data about the comet itself. The image below shows the Mars rovers and orbiters—including the newly arrived MAVEN spacecraft—that NASA is planning to utilize in studying Comet Siding Spring. Read more:http://www.space.com/27395-mars-comet-flyby-nasa-spacecraft.htmlhttp://cometcampaign.org/Take action: http://www.penny4nasa.org/take-action/

pennyfornasa:

“On October 19th, we’re going to observe an event that happens maybe once every million years.” – Dr. Jim Green, director of NASA’s planetary science division

NASA is gearing up for the opportunity of a lifetime, one that could yield new information about the conditions that shaped our solar system and the atmosphere on Mars. In just one week, Comet Siding Spring, also known as C/2013 A1, will make its first trip through the inner solar system and pass within 87,000 miles (139,500 kilometers) of the Martian surface—approximately one-third the distance between Earth and the moon. 

Siding Spring gets its name from Australia’s Siding Spring Observatory, where astronomer Rob McNaught discovered the comet in 2013. Since Siding Spring comes from the Oort Cloud (and this happens to be the comet’s first “heat-treatment”), it is likely that the comet remains largely unchanged since its formation nearly 4.6 billion years ago. This creates an opportunity for scientists to study the composition and behavior of an object very similar to those that filled the early solar system, which could provide further clues about the conditions that existed when the solar system first formed. 

NASA’s Mars orbiters and rovers are preparing to study both the comet and its effect on Mars’ atmosphere. By studying how the comet interacts with the Red Planet’s air, scientists hope to gain a better understanding of the Martian atmosphere, in addition to data about the comet itself. 

The image below shows the Mars rovers and orbiters—including the newly arrived MAVEN spacecraft—that NASA is planning to utilize in studying Comet Siding Spring. 

Read more:
http://www.space.com/27395-mars-comet-flyby-nasa-spacecraft.html
http://cometcampaign.org/

Take action: http://www.penny4nasa.org/take-action/

(via we-are-star-stuff)