18
Apr
The disturbance visible at the outer edge of Saturn’s A ring in this image from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft results from gravitational effects on ring particles by an object that may be replaying the birth process of icy moons.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute.

Saturn may have a baby moon forming, named Peggy.

Story at NPR.

The disturbance visible at the outer edge of Saturn’s A ring in this image from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft results from gravitational effects on ring particles by an object that may be replaying the birth process of icy moons.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute.

Saturn may have a baby moon forming, named Peggy.

Story at NPR.

14
Apr
Caption: These four spiral galaxies in NGC 4410 display an extraordinary cosmic spectacle, each generating immense tidal forces that rip each other apart as they pass close to each other. The galactic disks and spiral arms stretch apart while stellar filaments swirl into the intergalactic medium as the galaxies entwine in a dance of staggering proportions.

Text by Tom Chao, photo credit Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope/Coelum.

Caption: These four spiral galaxies in NGC 4410 display an extraordinary cosmic spectacle, each generating immense tidal forces that rip each other apart as they pass close to each other. The galactic disks and spiral arms stretch apart while stellar filaments swirl into the intergalactic medium as the galaxies entwine in a dance of staggering proportions.

Text by Tom Chao, photo credit Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope/Coelum.

9
Apr
Image: Cutaway showing what may be happening below Enceladus’ frozen exterior. Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Found at Wired, you can read Adam Mann’s article here.

The Cassini data suggests that the Enceladus ocean contains about the same mass as Lake Superior. But what it lacks in quantity, it makes up for in scale. The moon’s ocean is on average six miles deep, comparable to some of the deepest spots on our world’s oceans. Not bad for a tiny world dwarfed in size by our own.

Image: Cutaway showing what may be happening below Enceladus’ frozen exterior. Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Found at Wired, you can read Adam Mann’s article here.

The Cassini data suggests that the Enceladus ocean contains about the same mass as Lake Superior. But what it lacks in quantity, it makes up for in scale. The moon’s ocean is on average six miles deep, comparable to some of the deepest spots on our world’s oceans. Not bad for a tiny world dwarfed in size by our own.