2
Jul
humanoidhistory:

International Space Station resident Reid Wiseman captures a starry scene: “Orion’s belt runs just along the horizon, seen through Earth’s atmosphere and rising in this starry snapshot from low Earth orbit on board the International Space Station. The belt stars, Alnitak, Alnilam, and Mintaka run right to left and Orion’s sword, home to the great Orion Nebula, hangs above his belt, an orientation unfamiliar to denizens of the planet’s northern hemisphere. That puts bright star Rigel, at the foot of Orion, still higher above Orion’s belt. Of course the brightest celestial beacon in the frame is Sirius, alpha star of the constellation Canis Major. The station’s Destiny Laboratory module is in the foreground at the top right.”
(NASA)

humanoidhistory:

International Space Station resident Reid Wiseman captures a starry scene: “Orion’s belt runs just along the horizon, seen through Earth’s atmosphere and rising in this starry snapshot from low Earth orbit on board the International Space Station. The belt stars, Alnitak, Alnilam, and Mintaka run right to left and Orion’s sword, home to the great Orion Nebula, hangs above his belt, an orientation unfamiliar to denizens of the planet’s northern hemisphere. That puts bright star Rigel, at the foot of Orion, still higher above Orion’s belt. Of course the brightest celestial beacon in the frame is Sirius, alpha star of the constellation Canis Major. The station’s Destiny Laboratory module is in the foreground at the top right.”

(NASA)

2
Jul

Caption: Testing NASA’s base model for the agency’s future Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle. The module took flight from a large swing, nearing 50 mph (80.5 kph), before splashing down in a pool at NASA Langley’s Landing and Impact Research Facility, on August 2, 2011.

Photo credit: NASA. Found at The Atlantic: InFocus.

1
Jul
Caption: NASA astronauts Cady Coleman and Ricky Arnold step into the Orion crew module hatch during a series of spacesuit check tests conducted at the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility at the agency’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas on June 13, 2013.

Photo credit: Reuters/NASA.

Caption: NASA astronauts Cady Coleman and Ricky Arnold step into the Orion crew module hatch during a series of spacesuit check tests conducted at the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility at the agency’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas on June 13, 2013.

Photo credit: Reuters/NASA.

23
Jun
spaceplasma:

Coronal rain

On July 19, 2012, an eruption occurred on the sun that produced a moderately powerful solar flare and a dazzling magnetic display known as coronal rain. Hot plasma in the corona cooled and condensed along strong magnetic fields in the region. Magnetic fields, are invisible, but the charged plasma is forced to move along the lines, showing up brightly in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength of 304 Angstroms, and outlining the fields as it slowly falls back to the solar surface.

Credit: NASA,SDO

spaceplasma:

Coronal rain

On July 19, 2012, an eruption occurred on the sun that produced a moderately powerful solar flare and a dazzling magnetic display known as coronal rain. Hot plasma in the corona cooled and condensed along strong magnetic fields in the region. Magnetic fields, are invisible, but the charged plasma is forced to move along the lines, showing up brightly in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength of 304 Angstroms, and outlining the fields as it slowly falls back to the solar surface.

Credit: NASA,SDO

6
Jun
From redOrbit:

*Image Caption: In this artist’s conception, the doomed world Kepler-56b is being tidally shredded and consumed by its aging host star. New research shows that Kepler-56b will be engulfed by its star in about 130 million years, while its sibling Kepler-56c will be swallowed in 155 million years. This is the first time that two known exoplanets in a single system have a predicted “time of death.” *

Credit: David A. Aguilar (CfA)

From redOrbit:

*Image Caption: In this artist’s conception, the doomed world Kepler-56b is being tidally shredded and consumed by its aging host star. New research shows that Kepler-56b will be engulfed by its star in about 130 million years, while its sibling Kepler-56c will be swallowed in 155 million years. This is the first time that two known exoplanets in a single system have a predicted “time of death.” *

Credit: David A. Aguilar (CfA)

6
Jun
Photograph of pulsar SXP 1062 in the Small Magellanic Cloud.

From the write-up at Wired Space Photo of the Day:

Most pulsars whirl around incredibly quickly, spinning many times per second. However, by exploring the expanding bubble around this pulsar and estimating its age, astronomers have noticed something intriguing: SXP 1062 seems to be rotating far too slowly for its age. It is actually one of the slowest pulsars known.

Photo credit: ESA/XMM-NEWTON/ L. OSKINOVA/M. GUERRERO; CTIO/R. GRUENDL/Y.H. CHU

Photograph of pulsar SXP 1062 in the Small Magellanic Cloud.

From the write-up at Wired Space Photo of the Day:

Most pulsars whirl around incredibly quickly, spinning many times per second. However, by exploring the expanding bubble around this pulsar and estimating its age, astronomers have noticed something intriguing: SXP 1062 seems to be rotating far too slowly for its age. It is actually one of the slowest pulsars known.

Photo credit: ESA/XMM-NEWTON/ L. OSKINOVA/M. GUERRERO; CTIO/R. GRUENDL/Y.H. CHU

4
Jun

A coronal mass ejection burst off the side of the sun on May 9, 2014. The giant sheet of solar material erupting was the first CME seen by NASA’s Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph, or IRIS. The field of view seen here is about five Earth’s wide and about seven and a half Earth’s tall.